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1 Traditional agricultural landscapes, between Heritagization, Commodification and Tourism Sustainability
Chair: Elena Dell'Agnese (University of Milan-Bicocca)
2 Place names as a part of the cultural heritage (IGU Commission of Toponymy)
Chair: Peter Jordan (Austrian Academy of Sciences) & Cosimo Palagiano (Sapienza University of Rome)
3 The Maritime Cultural Heritage: discourse, practices and uses
Chairs: Lucrezia, Lopez, Rubén Lois González, María Ángeles Piñeiro Antelo (University of Santiago de Compostela)
4 Heritage and Islandness: the Islanders’ Narratives (AGeI- Association of Italialian Geographers. Working group on Archipelagic States and Small Islands Geography)
Chair: Stefano Malatesta (University of Milan Bicocca)
5 Dark Heritage (from below)
Chairs: Claudio Minca (Macquarie University) & Hamzah Bin Muzaini (National University of Singapore
6 Sharing the heritage: heritage narratives in the age of social media
Chairs: Fabio Pollice & Antonella Rinella (University of Salento)
7 Heritage and nationalism (IGU Commission on Political Geography)
Chair: Alec Murphy (University of Oregon)
8 Language (as) Heritage (in) Place: Political geographies of linguistic heritage geographies (IGU Commission on Political Geography)
Chair: Virginie Mamadouh (University of Amsterdam)
9 Education 'on the move': Exploring the heritage-tourism nexus
Chairs: Chiara Rabbiosi (University of Padua) & Alessia Mariotti (University of Bologna)
10 Heritage Geographies of Tourism: prospects and challenges (IGU Commission on Geography of Tourism; Leisure and Global Change)
Chairs: Velvet Nelson (Sam Houston State University), Jarkko Saarinen (University of Oulu) & Dieter Muller (University of Umeå)
11 Southern Thinking. Heritage, Migration and Mediterranean cultures (IGU Commission on History of Geography)
Chairs: Marcella Schmidt di Friedberg & Federico Ferretti
12 Local Government and the Governance of Urban Heritage (IGU Commission on Geography of Governance)
Chairs: Carlos Nunes Silva (University of Lisbon) & Anna Trono (University of Salento)
13 Citizen Participation in the Governance of Urban Heritage (IGU Commission on Geography of Governance)
Chairs: Carlos Nunes Silva (University of Lisbon) & Anna Trono (University of Salento)
14 Smart Governance and Urban Heritage (IGU Commission on Geography of Governance)
Chairs: Carlos Nunes Silva (University of Lisbon) & Anna Trono (University of Salento)
15 Urban Planning and Heritage (IGU Commission on Geography of Governance)
Chairs: Carlos Nunes Silva (University of Lisbon) & Anna Trono (University of Salento)
16 Landscape as heritage: critical perspectives
Chair: Giacomo Pettenati (University of Turin)
17 Heritage, tourism & ICTs in rural/marginal areas. A critical perspective
Chairs: Valentina Albanese (University of Bologna) & Teresa Graziano (University of Catania)
18 Heritage, Heterotopies and Urban Space Reconfigurations
Chairs: Valentina Albanese; Elisa Magnani; Matteo Proto; Andrea Zinzani (University of Bologna)
19 The geography of culture-led development
Chairs: Alessandra Faggian (Social Sciences, Gran Sasso Science Institute); Alessandro Crociata (Social Sciences, Gran Sasso Science Institute);
Fabio Pollice (University of Salento); Giulia Urso (Social Sciences, Gran Sasso Science Institute)
CALL FOR ABSTRACTS SESSION ABSTRACTS

1 Traditional agricultural landscapes, between Heritagization, Commodification and Tourism Sustainability
Chair: Elena Dell'Agnese (University of Milan-Bicocca)

Under World Heritage criteria, cultural landscapes are defined as cultural properties "illustrative of the evolution of human society and settlement over time, under the influence of the physical constraints and/or opportunities presented by their natural environment and of successive social, economic and cultural forces, both external and internal".
Therefore, more and more applications for this category include agricultural sites.
In fact, traditional agricultural practices, and the cultural landscape that derives from them, are often endowed with aesthetic significance and become objects of conservation and heritage. Sometimes, they are also the result of agricultural practices that involve a great deal of hard physical work, which can in no way be replaced by mechanized agriculture.
Thanks to this process of patrimonialisation, traditional agricultural landscapes can become the object of tourist attraction. Food and wine tourism, if linked to local agricultural production, is generally considered a form of slow and sustainable tourism, i.e. a providential activity for the territorial revaluation of the local agricultural system and for the preservation of the environment. But "the exceptional interaction between man and his environment", which is the basis of the Unesco recognition, is often interrupted. On the one hand, tourists often do not see that, beyond the splendid panorama and the wonderful wine, landscape in front of them, and that the products they consume, are the result of an extraordinary physical effort. On the other hand, agricultural regions subject to heritage conservation may also undergo an exodus from agriculture, especially when the expansion of tourist activities offers the local workforce jobs much less demanding and at the same time more profitable than farming. The difficulty of finding local workers often leads to the employment of seasonal, underpaid workers without adequate housing. Here, environmental and cultural sustainability are not associated with social sustainability.
The session is open to documents exploring the difficult link between tourism promotion and the preservation of traditional farming practices, within heritage cultural landscapes. Both papers focusing on theoretical reflection and case studies in the following fields are welcome. So, increasingly, nominations for this category include agricultural sites.
Indeed, traditional agricultural practices, and the resulting cultural landscape, are often endowed with aesthetic significance and become an object of conservation and heritagization. They are also the result of farming practices entailing a great deal of hard physical work, which can in no way be replaced by mechanised farming.
Thanks to this process of patrimonialization, traditional agricultural landscapes may become an object of tourist attraction. Food and wine tourism, if linked to local agricultural production, is generally considered a form of slow and sustainable tourism, that is, a providential activity for the territorial revaluation of the local agricultural system and for the conservation of the environment. But "the outstanding interaction between people and their environment" which is the basis of the Unesco recognition, is often interrupted.
On one hand, tourists often do not see that the landscape in front of them, and that the products they consume are the result of extraordinary physical effort. On the other, agricultural regions subject to heritage conservation may also subject to an exodus from agriculture, especially when the expansion of tourism activities offers the local workforce jobs more profitable than farming. The difficulty of finding local workers therefore leads to the employment of foreign seasonal workers, often underpaid. In this case, environmental and cultural sustainability are not associated with social sustainability.
The session is open to papers exploring the difficult link between tourism promotion and conservation of traditional agricultural parcels, within heritagized cultural landscapes. Both papers focusing on theoretical reflection and case studies in the following fields are welcomed.

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2 Place names as a part of the cultural heritage (IGU Commission of Toponymy)
Chair: Peter Jordan (Austrian Academy of Sciences) & Cosimo Palagiano (Sapienza University of Rome)


"What fossils are to biology, and sediments to geology, toponyms are to cultural history of a country because they reflect the various ethnic, economic, political and other changes in the past of the country." This sentence of the Bulgarian linguist Petar Ilievski illustrates very well the meaning of place names as a part of the cultural heritage. But it highlights only one of the aspects relevant. Another is the role of place names in space-related identity building of individuals and social groups - an aspect even more geographical.
That place names are important parts of the cultural heritage is all but new to linguists and historians. Among geographers, however, this fact has received significantly more attention only in more recent years. Traditional place names are partly very old, have been shaped in a certain linguistic, political, social and economic situation and have partly been transferred to succeeding languages. They are therefore a key to settlement and cultural history. They tell a lot about the character and the essence of a place, earlier economic and linguistic situations. They shed also a light on the cultural disposition and structure of the name-giving community. They form an inter-related system of names in a certain region, a "place-name landscape", describing historical, but very often still existing situations. Place names support space-related identity building. Mentioning or memorising the name of a familiar place lets the whole set of imaginations of a certain place arise, expresses or confirms the emotional relation of a person to a place. Place names are therefore an important element of feeling at home, not the least for linguistic minorities.
This results in the demand for special protection for names in minority languages, names in other receding languages and in dialects, the latter being subject to a significant erosion process due to the power of nation-wide media and trends towards cultural globalisation. Also exonyms need protection, since they are very often not standardised and not systematically documented. Dangers to which place names are exposed are partly provoked by the strong symbolic power of place names. And it is indeed so that the dominant force in a society wants to have the definition power over them. Changes in dominance (at all spatial scales, from the country down to the settlement level; also from the political to the commercial sphere) may result in renaming. Other dangers emerge from inadequate legislation to protect place names, the loss of knowledge of particular names, the changing way of life from rural to urban, the loss of oral traditions due to a lack of recording, globalisation and influence of other cultures as well as indiscriminate renaming and perpetuation of incorrect/incorrectly spelled versions of names.
The session will offer a forum to discuss all these various aspects and perhaps contribute to a better understanding of which important parts of the cultural heritage place names are. Essential bibliography:
Cantile A., Kerfoot H. (eds.) (2016), Place names as intangible cultural heritage. Firenze: United Nations Group of Experts on Geographical Names, Romano-Hellenic Division.
Jordan P., Bergmann H., Cheetham C., Hausner I. (eds.) (2009), Geographical Names as a Part of the Cultural Heritage (= Wiener Schriften zur Geographie und Kartographie, 18). Wien: Institut für Geographie und Regionalforschung.
Mitchell D. (2000), Cultural Geography. A Critical Introduction. Malden, Oxford, Carlton: Blackwell Publishing.
Sauer C. (1941), Foreword to historical geography. In: Annals of the Association of American Geographers, vol. 31, pp. 1-24.
Tuan Y.-F. (1977), Space and place: The perspective of experience. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.

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3 The Maritime Cultural Heritage: discourse, practices and uses
Chairs: Lucrezia, Lopez, Rubén Lois González, María Ángeles Piñeiro Antelo (University of Santiago de Compostela)

Cultural heritage has an important role because of its enormous social value for the community, its contribution to engender a sense of identity and its economic value by means of the tourism activity (Antonova & Rieser, 2018). It interprets the relationship between people and their environment, thus it is a spatial phenomenon.
Coastal communities are bound to knowledge, traditions, beliefs and professional skills that can be related to exploiting, trading and preserving marine and maritime resources (Howard & Pinder, 2004). Over centuries this cultural heritage proved the relationship between the people and the sea and today it can be defined as "Maritime Cultural Heritage" which "could be understood as all those cultural material goods (in water and on land) and immaterial (such as representations, perceptions, discourses, practices, material culture, customs, traditions, imageries, cultural landscapes) that are expressions of the maritime culture, of the maritimity, of the maritime differential fact and of the relation among man, sea and his surrounding; when possessing a cultural, emotional, or use value, among others" (Baron, 2008, p. 53). Coastal towns have their cultural artefacts, which engender different identity discourses, uses and governance, so their maritime cultural heritage should support local sustainable development strategies (Carbonell, 2014).
Considering all that, this session welcomes contributions from all over the world engaged in sharing, communicating and recovering heritage-related issues in different maritime contexts (Mediterranean, Atlantic, and so on). Given these premises, we invite contributions sharing the following aims of the session:
1. To advance an innovative approach to study the maritime cultural heritage;
2. To understand social, cultural and economic dynamics related to the use and management of the maritime cultural heritage;
3. To analyse and compare maritime cultural heritage discourses;
4. To point out differences and similarities among the Mediterranean and the Atlantic towns, which, even geographically different, share a territorial discourses associated to the "sea";
5. To analyse the initiatives of the coastal communities to recognize and reappropriate their own cultural legacy, turning it into narratives of the places to enhance the use and governance of the past.
Convenors will select the contributions submitted to this session for the publication of a Special Issue of a scientific review.

Essential bibliography:
Antonova, A. S. & Rieser, A. (2019). Curating collapse: performing maritime cultural heritage in Iceland's museums and tours. Maritime Studies, 18, 103. https://doi.org/10.1007/s40152-018-0128-2
Baron, A. T. O. (2008). Constructing the Notion of the Maritime Cultural Heritage in the Colombian Territory: Tools for the Protection and Conservation of Fresh and Salt Aquatic Surroundings. Division for Ocean Affairs and the Law of the Sea, Office of Legal Affairs, United Nations.
Carbonell, E. (2014). Maritime Heritage and Fishing in Catalonia. Coll. Antropol, 38(1), 289- 296.
Howard, P., & Pinder, D. (2003). Cultural heritage and sustainability in the coastal zone: experiences in south west England. Journal of Cultural Heritage, 4(1), 57-68.
Lopez, L., Piñeiro Antelo, M. A., & Gusman, I. (2018). The Portuguese Coastal Way and Maritime Heritage. An Outstanding Debt with the New Technologies. In Calabró, F., Bevilacqua, C. & della Spina, L. (eds.): New Metropolitan Perspectives Local Knowledge and Innovation Dynamics Towards Territory Attractiveness Through the Implementation of Horizon/E2020/Agenda2030 - Volume 1. Springer International Publishing AG, Cham, pp. 165-172.

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4 Heritage and Islandness: the Islanders’ Narratives (AGeI- Association of Italialian Geographers. Working group on Archipelagic States and Small Islands Geography)
Chair: Stefano Malatesta (University of Milan Bicocca)

Island Studies (Grydehøj 2017, Baldacchino 2018) stress the gap between insiders (islanders) and outsiders' views and representation of insularity and islandness (Conkling 2007). Geographical categories such as remoteness, smallness, vulnerability or fragmentation shape the image of islands as paradoxical places (Stratford, 2006) built on a complex and fascinating system of antithesis: fragile and resilient, strategic and peripheral, colonial and postcolonial, porous and caged, sovereign and not sovereign. The heritage, both material and immaterial, may be seen as a key driver of these geo-writing process. The session aims to focus, through the exposition of original theoretical contributions and case studies, on the use of natural, cultural and historical heritage islanders do to produce narratives on their islandness, a use that is often in contrast with outsiders' (non-islanders) one. Far from being merely a spatial feature, islandness here is understood as a form of self-representation, produced and reproduced even through the iconic and narrative power of material and immaterial objects constituting the cultural, natural and historical heritage of islands. Material (ecological niches, environmental and historical monuments, human artifacts and historical sites) and immaterial (fisheries practices, languages, literature and place telling) embody a spectrum of cultural and geographical features (such as uniqueness, remoteness, typicity) reinforcing a stereotyped idea of inslandness.
We encourage abstracts/papers submissions addressing theoretical issues and local studies in different islands contexts and proposing a geographical approach on three topics:
1. The use of heritage within political discourses on sovereignty, languages and cultural traits' protection.
2. The promotion of insular heritage as a strategy empowering place stewardship and environmental awareness.
3. The post-colonial readings of islands' heritage.

Essential bibliography:
Baldacchino, G. (2018), The Routledge International Handbook of Island Studies. A World of Island, Routledge.
Conkling P. (2007), On Islanders' and Islandess, Geographical Review, 92, 7, 191-201.
Grydehøj, A. (2017). A future of island studies, Island Studies Journal, 12(1), 3-16.
MacLeod D, Cultural Realignment, Islands and the Influence of Tourism: A new conceptual approach, in "Shima. The International Journal of Research Into Island Cultures", vol. 7, n. 2 (2013), pp. 74-91
Stratford, E., Baldacchino, G., McMahon, E., Farbotko, C. & Harwood, A. (2011). Envisioning the Archipelago. Island Studies Journal, 6(2), 113-130.
Taglioni, F. (2011). Insularity, Political Status and Small Insular Spaces: a Critical Review. The International Journal of Research into Island Cultures. 5(2), 45-67.

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5 Dark Heritage (from below)
Chairs: Claudio Minca (Macquarie University) & Hamzah Bin Muzaini (National University of Singapore)

Inspired by the work of Laurajanne Smith and Iain Robertson (see also Muzaini and Minca, 2018) this session intends to critically explore how alternative forms of 'heritage from below' are performed by groups and individuals in sites charged with historical and political meaning. It also invites interventions focused on personal, often ephemeral, individual experiences of institutional heritage sites, together with alternative ways in which groups of individuals 'socialize' such sites often diverting if not even transgressing their official meaning. Contributions addressing the practices related to the visit of sites marked by a difficult or dark past are particularly welcomed. Many sites of past death and suffering have become today major tourist attractions: the question of what is legitimate for visitors do to and not to do in those sites, and the political meaning of their practices-on-site are key elements to appreciate the complexity and the inherently contested nature of any contemporary spatial re-enactment of difficult past events.

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6 Sharing the heritage: heritage narratives in the age of social media
Chairs: Fabio Pollice & Antonella Rinella (University of Salento)

The interest of geography towards media, as well as their role in the processes of place-building and shared enhancement, suggests new and innovative perspectives for both theoretical and applied analysis. Place narratives and related representations, as well as construction processes therein subtended, are an example, and their study is the base of Placetelling™(Pollice, 2017). Placetelling™ is an ongoing methodology aiming to:
- Promote place-based and local-oriented narratives, able to trigger endogenous local development according to the principles of sustainability (illustrative narrative);
- Communicate and transmit place identities to those belonging to other cultures and contexts, so to stimulate an empathic experience and, more generally, boost local attractiveness (attractive narrative).
In other words, Placetelling™ aims to underline the spirit of the place, mostly inspired by tangible and intangible heritage. However, the spirit of the place continuously re-shapes itself, starting from everyday spaces lived according to symbolic-cognitive paths deriving from the negotiation and re-definition of shared symbols and meanings; hence, to scrutinize the perceptions within those identity systems where symbolization processes take place is more and more relevant. In this sense, media are strongly representative of symbols and meanings layered in a given territory. Nevertheless, the more a territory is fluid, the more it is difficult to take the sense of place for granted, as it is called into question by the conflict between local community's shared values and non-locals' perceptions.
The reflection is not limited to the only place semiotics, as it becomes pivotal whether the symbolic layer of a place becomes the core of enhancement strategies for local development.
This session focuses on bottom-up narratives, delivered by both locals and non-locals, as those shared through social media. Hence, contributions could develop case studies dealing with specific modes of production and popularization of self-produced contents, as well as the evolution of iconemas, the development of bottom-up enhancement processes and the related role of Placetelling™.


Essential bibliography:
Dittmer Jason e Nicholas Gray (2010), Popular Geopolitics 2.0: Towards New Methodologies of the Everyday, in "Geography Compass",4, 11, pp. 1664 - 1677Dittmer Jason e Klaus Dodds (2008), Popular Geopolitics Past and Future: Fandom, Identities and Audiences, in "Geopolitics", 13, pp.437-457
Page Ruth (2012), Stories and Social Media, Taylor & Francis, New York
Pollice Fabio (2017), Placetelling®. Per uno sviluppo della coscienza dei luoghi e dei loro patrimoni, in "Territori della Cultura", 30, pp. 112-117.

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7 Heritage and nationalism (IGU Commission on Political Geography)
Chair: Alec Murphy (University of Oregon)

Nationalism is premised on celebrating and sustaining a particular story of a territory and its people-where they came from, how they are distinctive, and why they are special. As such, nationalism and heritage are inextricably linked. Many efforts to preserve and promote aspects of a place's heritage reflect nationalist ideas or ambitions, and the results of such efforts can influence nationalist ideologies and practices.
The heritage-nationalism nexus has been the focus of some scholarly attention within geography and related disciplines. Much of the work to date has focused on capital cities, especially how how their landscapes reflect particular nationalist ideas and ambitions. Studies in this vein have focused on the remaking of the landscape of capital cities to glorify the nation (e.g., John Agnew's work on Rome), the construction of new capital cities that embrace selective elements of national history (e.g., Natalie Koch's work on the monumental cities of Central Asia), and the ways in which the locational choices and development strategies of sub-state capitals are a product of nation-building ambitions (e.g., Christian Montès' work on American colonial, territorial, and State capitals).
The relationship between heritage and nationalism is not just about capital cities, however. It is also about more general governmental strategies to preserve and promote selected elements of the past, the competing efforts of different groups to create landscapes that evoke selected national stories, and the discursive struggles over the hsritage-infused iconography of nationalism.
This session on the nationalism-heritage nexus welcomes conceptual and empirical papers pertaining to the links between nationalism and heritage. Diverse approaches are welcome. Themes include:
" Nationalist imaginations as expressed in heritage landscapes
" The uses of heritage to promote particular bordering ideas and practices
" The nationalist underpinnings of overarching state-government approaches to heritage preservation
" Landscape indicators of contested nationalist territorial ambitions
" The role of migrant and diasporic communities in the creation of heritage landscapes
" The nationalist impulse behind efforts to control the discourses around heritage and related iconographic practices.

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8 Language (as) Heritage (in) Place: Political geographies of linguistic heritage geographies (IGU Commission on Political Geography)
Chair: Virginie Mamadouh (University of Amsterdam)

Language is highly political as meaning producer, as tool of communication, and as identity marker. Language is also intrinsically linked to heritage: both as a vehicle to communicate heritage, as a tool to write heritage in space, and as heritage itself.
Mother tongue is often key to the transmission of intangible cultural heritage, especially among members of linguistic minorities. Heritage languages are cherished by many migrants, while others abandon them in the acculturation process and the appropriation of the main language of their new country of residence.
Language use is also part and parcel of place making processes and of bordering processes. The presence of a minority language in the linguistic landscape of a particular city (i.e. on the signs in the public space) is often read as a sign of vitality. The configuration between different languages in the linguistic landscape and soundscape attests of power relations between language groups and their evolution over time. In border regions the historical role of languages in contact has been contested. Linguistic heritage, including distinction from other, neighbouring languages, has been shaped by competing narratives about their origin and evolution.
States and other institutions have deployed language policies to foster, maintain and develop their preferred language(s), to protect it (or them) from the intrusion of other languages, more specifically hegemonic languages: typically English with globalization, but also French in former French colonies, Russian in the Soviet bloc, and in the near future perhaps Chinese in Africa. More specifically national languages have been constructed as core value of national identities and heritage and nationalist ideologies have often promote the idea that territory of the state, the nation and the language should coincided.
Moreover linguistic heritage is fundamentally spatial and should be studied in its socio-spatial dimensions. Language ideologies shape our understanding of the relation between languages, places and territories. Territorial claims are often justified by language facts and narratives about languages shape social and spatial borders. Territorial cleansing often includes the erasure of a specific language from the local heritage. Toponymical practices are part of such linguistic encoding of space.
This session on linguistic heritage welcomes conceptual and empirical papers about heritage geographies pertaining to the many relations between language and space, addressing politics, use and governance of linguistic heritage. Diverse approaches are welcome. Themes include:
" Geographical imaginations of past language contacts
" Migration and heritage language
" Language as vehicle for intangible heritage
" Linguistic landscape and (material) heritage
" Contested geopolitical representations of languages and language groups
" Language standardization and homogenization and heritage at the margins of national territory
" Extraterritorial language policies and diasporas
" The role of supranational and international organizations regarding to linguistic heritage
" Toponymy and heritage

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9 Education 'on the move': Exploring the heritage-tourism nexus
Chairs: Chiara Rabbiosi (University of Padua) & Alessia Mariotti (University of Bologna)

Tourism is considered one of the eminent facets of mobility. The international spread of tourism worldwide and its intersection with the realm of cultural policy has the potential to turn the heritage-tourism nexus into a significant tool of education 'on the move'. While heritage education is already established and is at the core of the policies of international organisations such as UNESCO or ICOMOS, or even of national ones, an idea of 'tourism education' is far less explored and supported. On the contrary, there is a desperate need to raise awareness among a large arena of actors (including tourists, professionals, institutions, etc.) on how their practices impact on global environmental, societal and political challenges. To answer this gap, in this session we are interested in analysing and questioning:
o the learning potential of tourist practices, in particular as they engage with cultural heritage and with geographical education 'on the move';
o the challenges that mobility poses to educational experiences that use tourism as a tool to discover, interact with, and co-create cultural heritage;
o the downscaling of a variety of programmes from the international to the local level, from the universal principles of charts and declarations to their implementation in places' ordinary life;
o spatial ideologies underpinning policies, practices and representations of heritage and tourism education.
We particularly invite papers that consider the entanglements of these levels through a mobility approach. Proposals may consider schools' and educational tourism (How does mobility critically engage with geographical and heritage education? Which (mobile) networks do schools' and educational tourism entail? Which frictions arise?); or critically reflect upon non formal education methodologies, such as for instance those emerging from the Faro Convention (Which are the educational methods proposed by international charters or transnational programmes and how do they call into questions issues of mobility?); think spatially to the political ideals that are mobilised through programmes or initiatives sustaining the heritage-tourism educational nexus (such as, for instance, cultural Europeanisation or nationalism); or connect the topics proposed with changes in consumption habits and/or working conditions in their space-time dimensions.

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10 Heritage Geographies of Tourism: prospects and challenges (IGU Commission on Geography of Tourism; Leisure and Global Change)
Chairs: Velvet Nelson (Sam Houston State University) & Jarkko Saarinen (University of Oulu)

Heritage tourism is one of the most prominent and widespread forms of tourism. It is growing rapidly and constantly involving new places and heritage resources to its circle of economy. Heritage tourism can utilize very different types of heritage resources: both cultural and natural, material and immaterial forms of heritage. There are also different types of impacts the tourism industry can create for heritage resources and local communities and economies. In general, tourism development has often been viewed as a positive force not only in terms of its potential to stimulate local and regional economies but also its ability to protect the heritage on which it is based. However, tourism geographers have also raised critical questions about the potential negative impact the industry can create and the nature of the heritage (re)presented to tourists as well as tourists' consumption of this heritage. In particular, the increasing recognition of the negative impacts of tourism due to factors such as uncontrolled growth has raised additional concerns that tourism may be endangering the heritage on which it is based. As such, this session invites contributions that reflect prospects and challenges linked on the production and/or consumption of heritage tourism through topics such as, but not limited, to commodification, interpretation, contested heritage, tourist experiences, community role and participation, overtourism, and sustainable and responsible heritage tourism.


Essential bibliography:
Cohen, E. (1988). Authenticity and commodisation in tourism. Annals of Tourism Research 15:3, 371-386.
McKercher, B. & du Cros, H. (2002). Cultural Tourism: The Partnership between Tourism and Cultural Heritage Management. Binghamton: The Haworth Press.
Smith, M. (2003). Issues in cultural tourism studies. London: Routledge.
Timothy, D. (2011). Cultural heritage tourism. Bristol: Channelview.
Timothy, D. & Boyd, S. (2003). Heritage tourism. Harlow: Pearson Education.

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11 Southern Thinking. Heritage, Migration and Mediterranean cultures (IGU Commission on History of Geography)
Chairs: Marcella Schmidt di Friedberg & Federico Ferretti

For this session, we welcome empirical or theoretical contributions that place heritage-related issues in the context of Mediterranean histories, cultures and circulations. The Mediterranean has disgracefully become a (disputed and violent) frontier, while in several historical periods it has been a "valley" putting different cultures in mutual communication and cross-pollination. These notions, which are expressed in a heterogeneous way, can be found in the works of classical geographers such as Carl Ritter and Elisée Reclus, of avant-garde artists such as Paul Signac and Henri Matisse and leading 20th-century European intellectuals such as Paul Valéry, Albert Camus and Gilles Deleuze. More recently, they have returned in the 'Southern Thinking' by Franco Cassano and in the concept of multiple 'Souths' by the Latin American authors of the Modernity-Coloniality-Decoloniality movement. Contributions refreshing the relations between these lines of thought and debates on geography and heritage, tangible and intangible, would be greatly appreciated. Interventions on other seas and maritime circulations are also welcome.
We would especially like to receive proposals on:
Decolonial thinking and geographies of the Souths;
Southern thinking and postcolonial, decolonial and anticolonial approaches in geography and cognate disciplines;
Southern thinking and decoloniality in their relation to feminism and gendered approaches;
Mediterranean worlds and metaphors in geography;
Historical geographies of Italy and other Mediterranean countries;
Historical geographies and geopolitics of land and sea;
Critical and radical geographies and their relations to heritage issues;
Works and lives of geographers committed to intercultural dialogue, anti-racism and anti-colonialism;
Geopoetics, artistic and literary geographies from/about the Souths;
Geography and geophilosophy;
Geographies of migration and culture's meetings;
Any other topic in the history and philosophy of geography

Essential bibliography:
F. Cassano, Il pensiero meridiano, Roma/Bari, Laterza, 1996.
J. Chabot, Albert Camus, la pensée de midi, Aix-en-Provence, Edisud, 2002.
G. Deleuze, F. Guattari, Qu'est-ce que la philosophie? Paris, Les éditions de Minuit, 1991.
W. Mignolo, A. Escobar (eds.) Globalization and the decolonial option. London, Routledge, 2010.
E. Reclus, L'Homme et la Terre, Paris, Librairie Universelle, 1905-1908.

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12 Local Government and the Governance of Urban Heritage (IGU Commission on Geography of Governance)
Chairs: Carlos Nunes Silva (University of Lisbon) & Anna Trono (University of Salento)

This session aims to explore recent changes in the role of local government in the governance of urban cultural heritage. Papers can be focused on local government issues (instititutional models, cooperation models, organizational and financial issues, etc.) in specific local case studies or may offer a comparison of policy cases in municipalities and cities in the same country or in different countries. The session aims also to examine and to discuss past policy approaches in the field of cultural heritage management at sub-national tiers of government. Although the focus is on local and urban government, the analysis should consider, when appropriate, the multi-level urban heritage governance context. The session is supported by the IGU Commission Geography of Governance and is proposed for sub-theme: 1. Heritage governance.

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13 Citizen Participation in the Governance of Urban Heritage (IGU Commission on Geography of Governance)
Chairs: Carlos Nunes Silva (University of Lisbon) & Anna Trono (University of Salento)

This session aims to explore the role and forms of citizen participation in the governance of
Urban heritage. The session aims in particular to address citizen engagement in urban planning processes, namely in innovative models of urban planning and in alternative modes of urban heritage governance. The session is open to include case studies, comparative studies and historical analysis of citizen engagement in urban planning focused on cultural heritage. The session is supported by the IGU Commission Geography of Governance and is proposed for sub-theme: 2. Heritage and Urban Planning.

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14 Smart Governance and Urban Heritage (IGU Commission on Geography of Governance)
Chairs: Carlos Nunes Silva (University of Lisbon) & Anna Trono (University of Salento)

This session aims to explore, discuss and present innovative theoretical and empirical research and ground-breaking approaches in the field of Urban e-Planning and its impact on the governance of Urban heritage. The session aims in particular to explore the impact of the growing number of digital innovations, new methods and new digital tools in the field smart governance of urban heritage. We welcome papers that address the current digital transition (digitization of urban governance and urban planning procedures, datafication of urban heritage activities and services, among other important changes) and its impact on the governance of urban heritage. The session is open to include case studies and comparative studies. The session is supported by the IGU Commission Geography of Governance and is proposed for sub-theme: 5. Heritage and ICT's.

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15 Urban Planning and Heritage (IGU Commission on Geography of Governance)
Chairs: Carlos Nunes Silva (University of Lisbon) & Anna Trono (University of Salento)

The session aims to address how urban heritage is included and dealt with in the formal national spatial planning systems. In particular, the session seeks to explore institutional innovations in the field of Urban Planning related to the urban cultural heritage as well as the new tools employed by municipalities in the planning and governance of urban heritage. The session is open to include case studies as well as comparative studies. The session is supported by the IGU Commission Geography of Governance and is proposed for sub-theme: 2. Heritage and Urban Planning.

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16 Landscape as heritage: critical perspectives

Chair: Giacomo Pettenati (University of Turin)

In their introduction to the special issue of the Landscape Research journal entitled "Landscape of heritage and heritage landscape", David Harvey and Emma Waterton note that, even if both landscape and heritage are widely discussed notions in the scholarly debate, "they have sat together too confortably, and for too long, within academic, policy and popular imagination" (Harvey and Waterton, 2015, p.905), calling for a critical approach to the research and interpretation of the relationships between these intertwined concepts.
The patrimonialisation of landscape (i.e. the identification of a landscape as heritage by individuals or groups) is a complex process, deeply linked to some specific characteristics of the notion of landscape itself, such as: the insiders/outsiders perspective, the selective and potentially exclusive nature of every landscape (and heritage) representation, the inherent continuously changing nature of landscapes, the complex governance of protected landscapes, the tension between use, transformation and conservation of artifacts and natural resources (Scazzosi, 2004).
This session welcomes contributions proposing critical reflections on landscape as heritage, trying to focus on the following topics:
- The critical analysis of the processes of landscapes patrimonialisation, with a specific focus on the power relationships that support the identification as heritage of some of the many landscapes that co-exist in the same places, through the definition of an "authorized heritage (or landscape) discourse" (Smith, 2009).
- Reflections on the governance of heritage landscapes. How landscape can be managed as heritage, when it is inherently constantly changing and it is linked to specific socio-economic systems, without "freezing" it in an imagined past?
- Critical contributions reflecting on the existing programs of safeguard and valorization of landscape as heritage, through the identification of "exceptional landscapes" (e.g. the Unesco World Heritage List or the IUCN protected landscapes approach).
- The heritage potential of ordinary and minorities landscapes, as inclusive and multivocal approach to the identification, representation and safeguard of landscape.

Essential bibliography:
Harvey D. (2015), "Landscape and heritage: trajectories and consequences", Landscape Research, 40:8, 911-924
Harvey, D. C., & Waterton, E. (2015). "Landscapes of heritage and heritage landscapes" Landscape Research, 40:8, 905-910.
Olwig, K. R., & Mitchell, D. (2007). Justice, power and the political landscape: from American space to the European Landscape Convention: introduction to a special issue. Landscape Research, 32(5), 525-531.
Scazzosi L. (2004), "Reading and Assessing the Landscape as Cultural and Historical Heritage", Landscape Research, Vol. 29, No. 4, 335-355
Smith L. (2006), Uses of Heritage, London, Routledge

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17 Heritage, tourism & ICTs in rural/marginal areas. A critical perspective
Chairs: Valentina Albanese (University of Bologna) & Teresa Graziano (University of Catania)

Over the last decades, the increasing pervasiveness of advanced technologies in tourist practices have led to the co-creation of tourism destinations, which entails an unprecedented role played by tourists as producers of shared multimedia travel-related contents as well as cocreators of destination images (Gretzel et al., 2015).
The concept of a networked travel (Germann Molz, Paris, 2015), based on the growingly pervasive role played by the Web 2.0 in shaping unprecedented tourism practices (Urry, Larsen 2011; Dinhopl 2016), is incorporated in the wider conceptual framework of smart city. While several studies have been conducted to explore the role of ICT's in urban tourism (Romão et al., 2017), the application, usability and territorial effects of new technologies in the rural/marginal areas have remained underdiscussed in the literature for years (Visvizi, Lytras, 2018). As a matter of fact, on the one hand smart technologies can be effective and useful tools to enhance local cultural heritage as well as support rural areas in facing challenges such as marginalization and depopulation. On the other hand, some controversial power relations could emerge from the growing pervasiveness of technologies, particularly in areas traditionally characterized by "slow" everyday ways of life. What is more, another crucial question is related to tourists' expectations and requests, which could challenge local heritage integrity. As a result, this session will welcome both theoretical and empirical papers that aim at scrutinizing the role of smart tourism in enhancing or, on the contrary, challenging cultural heritage in rural/marginal areas. Contributions about the controversial relations between ICTs and (de)territorialization in rural/marginal areas will be particularly welcomed, in order to understand to what extent cutting-edge technologies can positively enhance sustainable slow tourism practices or, on the contrary, foster new forms of inequalities, deterritorialization and unbalanced power relations.

Essential bibliography:
Gretzel U., Sigala M., Xiang Z., Koo C., Smart tourism: foundations and developments, Electron Markets, 25, 2015, 179-188.
Romão J., Kourtit K., Neuts B., Nijkamp P., The smart city as a common place for tourists and residents: A structural analysis of the determinants of urban attractiveness, Cities, 2017, Retrieved from https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cities.2017.11.007.
Germann Molz J., Paris C, The social affordances of flashpacking: Exploring the mobility nexus of travel and communication, Mobilities, 10, 2015, 2: 173-192.
Urry J., Larsen J., The Tourist Gaze 3.0, London, Sage, 2011.
Dinhopl A., Gretzel U, Selfie-taking as touristic looking, Annals of Tourism Research, 57, 2016, 126-139.
Visvizi A., Lytras M. D., It's Not a Fad: Smart Cities and Smart Villages Research in European and Global Contexts, Sustainability, 2018, 10, 2727.

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18 Heritage, Heterotopies and Urban Space Reconfigurations
Chairs: Valentina Albanese; Elisa Magnani; Matteo Proto; Andrea Zinzani (University of Bologna)

Our contribution seeks to advance the reflection on the concept of heterotopies applied to urbanscapes. In this framework, heterotopies could be defined as specific portions of urbanscapes shaped by urban reconfiguration and regeneration processes connected to cultural heritage valorization and oriented towards economic growth, real estate and tourism development. The role played by these extra-configuratives urban spaces questions and redefines socio-spatial relations: despite these heterotopies lie in the urban context, they challenge local communities interactions and could lead to urban space fragmentation. Today, urban tourism development, supported by current global capital dynamics, is shaped by policies and initiatives which move towards cultural heritage capitalization. This reconfiguration is based on the promotion of individual urban experiences and local culture valorization strengthened by a marketing discourse that includes buzzwords such as smartness and slowness. Cultural heritage expressions, reshaped by tourism marketing, are attractive as well as authentic local traditions and historical, artistic and architectural heritage. However, tourist and speculative reinterpretation simplifies and alters the value of cultural heritage and may deprive it of its true meaning, thus leading to the paradox in which the commodification of culture alters the cultural heritage of a territory.
Recent examples of urbanscapes revitalization, connected to the recovery and invention of cultural heritage, have determined the growth of segregated spaces which may bring back to the idea of heterotopy, i.e, those experiences of food spectacularization or valorization of artisticmusicalphenomena, aimed at promoting the development of tourism or real estate speculation.
Researchers are invited to present papers on the following issues:
- Relationships between urban regeneration and cultural heritage
- Capital accumulation and cultural heritage
- Examples of urban heterotopies connected to a revitalization of
heritage in tourist perspective
- Transformation of urban districts in connection to cultural tourism
- Spectacularization of the "belle epoque" heritage
- Space created from the global tourist industry, and how it affects

Essential bibliography
Dell'Agnese E., "One island, one resort". Il turismo enclave alle Maldive come eterotopia pianificata, in Bollettino della Società Geografica Italiana, serie 14, 1(1): 27-39, 2018
Foucault M., Des espaces autres, conférence au Cercle d'études architecturales, 14 mars 1967, Architecture, Mouvement, Continuité, 5, 46-49, 1984.
Heynen, N., M. Kaika, Swyngedouw, E., In the nature of cities: Urban political ecology and the politics of urban metabolism, New York, Routledge, 2006.
Minca C., The Bali Syndrome: the explosion and implosion of 'exotic' tourist space, in Tourism Geographies, 2: 389-403, 2000.
Smith N., Uneven Development: Nature, Capital and the Productionof Space, Athens, University of Georgia Press, 2008.

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19 The geography of culture-led development
Chairs: Alessandra Faggian (Social Sciences, Gran Sasso Science Institute); Alessandro Crociata (Social Sciences, Gran Sasso Science Institute); Fabio Pollice (University of Salento); Giulia Urso (Social Sciences, Gran Sasso Science Institute)

In recent decades, geography and regional sciences have experienced an increasing interest in culture-led development that is based on the idea that culture and creativity are key drivers of urban and regional development. Scholarly discussion is lively and articulated, with an insightful and still open debate on theoretical issues and empirical evidence. A growing literature on the so-called "cultural turn" (Amin and Thrift, 2007) covers a range of multidimensional issues by moving from the basic - yet questioned - assumption that the cultural and creative economy is a major force shaping knowledge-based economies, and that is conducive to sustainable regional development with more jobs and greater social cohesion (Pratt 2004; Scott 2004; Comunian, Faggian and Li 2010; Sacco et. al, 2012; Boix-Domenech and Soler-Marco 2015; Crociata et al. 2015).
The year 2018, being the European Year of Cultural Heritage, has boosted the interest of scholars in providing a more appropriate formulation of background principles and target objectives for the cultural and creative sectors in the wider context of EU's competitiveness and cohesion policies. This is also an ongoing opportunity to overcome the traditional focus on the mere sectorial growth and to pay more attention to the effects that culture-led development processes may produce by looking at several dimensions of analysis and using an interdisciplinary lens.
More specifically, greater attention should be devoted to the role of space/place in culture-led development. Culture lies at the heart of urban and regional renewal. Evidence shows the power of culture as a strategic asset capable of addressing three kinds of imbalances: the economic one, the environmental one and the social one. A spatial investigation would contribute to a better understanding of the factors fostering local development and those enhancing cultural heritage. A particularly interesting context of application would be intermediate (or small-medium towns) and peripheral areas, which are far from urban poles, commonly recognized as the cores for this kind of development.
Given the importance of the spatial dimension highlighted above, our Special Session The geography of culture-led development fits well the IGU Thematic Conference "Heritage Geographies: Politics, Uses and Governance of the Past".
The aim of the special session is to attract contributions focusing on: Cultural and creative Industries and regional innovation; Cultural and creative industries as developmental driver of local economies; Cultural heritage as driver of tourism investments; Cultural assets and sustainability: access, inclusiveness and community wellbeing; Cultural heritage management and tourism development in contexts of crisis; cultural heritage and industries and resilience; culture-led development in small-medium towns and peripheral/remote areas.
If your research interests fall within the topics above, please consider submitting a paper for our special session. We are looking forward to receiving contributions to stimulate an interesting debate!

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